Shackleton’s Journey is a unique visual re-telling Ernest Shackleton’s landmark expedition crossing the Antarctic from one pole to the other. William Grill’s impeccably researched and informative illustrations celebrate the 100th anniversary since the historic exploration by Shackelton and his crew on Endurance. Children will love exploring Grill’s exploded diagrams and the fascinating details of this landmark voyage.

 

Read our blog about Shackleton’s Journey, with some ideas for how to use it in the classroom here.

A brilliantly diverse cast of characters face heartbreak and home truths as they return to their old school and discover no one can ever truly go back.Four friends meet up at their old school to open the memory box they stowed there years ago – with five letters inside for four of them, because their friend Millie has died. When they open the box they find a new letter from Millie and discover that she has left them special instructions: permission to open her letter only if they all read aloud the letters they wrote to their older selves, revealing their deepest secrets.

Clive loves his collection of bags, and each one suggests a different adventure. He enjoys playing with them, and sharing them with his friends. A gentle, affectionate book, celebrating diversity and challenging gender stereotypes

From the incomparable Russell Hoban comes a moving, unflinching tale of a boy who finds bravery during illness, beautifully re-imagined as a graphic-novel by award-winning illustrator Alexis Deacon. Asleep in his hospital bed, Jim dreams of a great lion with white teeth and amber eyes. This lion is Jim’s finder. According to Nurse Bami, everyone has a finder, a creature who comes looking for us when we are lost. But when the time comes for Jim’s operation, will his lion be able to find him and bring him safely home? With the inclusion of powerful dream sequences, and a triumphant message of facing one’s fears, Russell Hoban’s tale of a boy’s search for strength and courage will resonate with any child dealing with adversity or sickness.

George can’t roller-skate, George can’t paint, and George most certainly can’t dance!

But Bear is very wise. She thinks that, with a little help, George can do all these things – and more!

And, luckily for George, Bear has just a little magic to help . . .

 

Franklin the dragon loves stories and loves reading stories to people too, but everyone is too scared to even look at him. One day he meets a girl named Luna who, far from being scared, is fascinated to meet Franklin, having recently read all about dragons in one of her books. They instantly become friends and talk non-stop about what they’ve read: books about roller skating, King Arthur, spiders and how to do kung fu. Together, they hatch a plan to share their love of books with others by opening a bookshop – a flying bookshop, that is – right on Franklin’s back!

One day in the forest, a young bear stumbles upon something he has never seen before. As time passes, he teaches himself how to play the strange instrument – and, eventually, the beautiful sounds are heard by a father and son who are picnicking in the woods.

The bear’s piano playing makes him a huge star, but he misses the friends and family he has left behind. Could it be that money and celebrity are not everything?

A heat-warming fable about a friendship and belonging from the award-winning illustrator Petr Horacek. “I feel just like a penguin,” says Blue Penguin. “But you’re not like us,” said the other penguins and they left him all alone. Poor Blue Penguin. Will he be able to convince the other penguins he is one of them after all? A moving and beautifully illustrated story from Petr Horacek, an illustrator described by the Washington Post as “the thinking tot’s Eric Carle”.

While Baljit shovels chips in is dad’s chippy, he dreams of football stardom. Then the chance of a lifetime comes along – a trial for the Premier League.

But Baljit is sure his parents will disapprove, and so the lies begin. Will Baljit’s parents cost him his dream – or will his own lies trip him up?

Told from the perspective of Little Bear and capturing his determination to be big and brave just like his father, the youngest of readers will rejoice in the story, the warmth of the simple narrative and the artwork of illustration star, Emily Hughes.