Laila Levenson has always been the baby of the family, but now with her older siblings, Mira and Krish, leaving home just as she starts secondary school, everything feels like it’s changing… can the reappearance of Nana Josie’s Protest Book and the spirit it releases in Laila, her friends and her local community, help her find her own voice and discover what she truly believes in? 
 

A powerful chime rings through Laila’s mind, guiding her to walk the footsteps of the past on her way to discover her own future.

Jay’s creative writing exercise is to write a fairy tale, to end with they lived happily ever after. But the way her life is panning out she s not sure it will ever reach that stage. She and her mother are moving in with distant relatives, and they have super strict rules for girls. Jay is expected to have only Indian friends if she has any at all. How can she see her school friends, Chloe and Matt? But this is only the beginning of a nightmare for Jay. When her life implodes, how can she hide the shame and how will she find a way to keep going?

Published in August 2019. It was Pick of the Week for Love Reading 4 Schools, and Book of the Week at Letterbox Library.

 

Jeevan’s an A star student in every subject apart from English. He suspects his English teacher, Mrs. Greaves, of marking him down on purpose. But no one believes him – even his best friends, Dread and Sandi, think he’s over-reacting. It seems that his teacher dislikes him intensely. He is sure that she is prejudiced against him because he is Asian.

Walking home from school through the woods, Jeevan catches Mrs. Greaves and another teacher, Mr. Green, up to something they shouldn’t be doing, and now he’s got this radioactive video that he could use against Mrs. Greaves.

But he’s caught in a moral dilemma – to do the right thing, or not?

That Asian Kid is a compelling story that explores the themes of racism, of identity, justice.

From the heroes familiar to everyone, such as Malala Yousafzai, to the amazing activists you might not have heard of, like Baruani Ndume, the teenager who gave a voice to fellow refugee children in Tanzania, discover the incredible true stories of child activists.

 

An inspirational and moving book from beloved author-illustrator Marcia Williams, providing the perfect introduction to an important subject and marking 30 years since the Convention on the Rights of the Child was signed by the United Nations General Assembly.

Told with heart and humour, The Boy at the Back of the Class is a child’s perspective on the refugee crisis, highlighting the importance of friendship and kindness in a world that doesn’t always make sense.

There used to be an empty chair at the back of my class, but now a new boy called Ahmet is sitting in it.

He’s nine years old (just like me), but he’s very strange. He never talks and never smiles and doesn’t like sweets – not even lemon sherbets, which are my favourite!

But then I learned the truth: Ahmet really isn’t very strange at all. He’s a refugee who’s run away from a War. A real one. With bombs and fires and bullies that hurt people. And the more I find out about him, the more I want to help.

That’s where my best friends Josie, Michael and Tom come in. Because you see, together we’ve come up with a plan. . .