Eve Cartright is a young black girl growing up with her mum in London in the late 16th century. Life is tough, Eve is almost always hungry, and they always seem to be just one step away from gruesome poverty, despite her hard-working mum’s best efforts.

When Eve nearly drowns and her mum’s expert diving to save her is noted by George Symons, a man with links to the sunken ship the Mary Rose, could they be on a pathway to riches? George sends them on a mission to persuade African diver Jacque Francis to guide them to the treasure. But the road is full of danger and betrayal.

This is a thrilling tale, with the expertly described Tudor world brought to hideous, harsh life with the same verve as Patrice Lawrence’s award winning teen books Indigo Donut and Orangeboy. Although the story of Eve and her mother is fictional, there really was an African diver Jacque Francis in Tudor times, along with very many other people of colour living in Elizabethan times, despite the “white-washing” of history.

Anna and Otis the snake are great friends and they love having fun together. But Otis knows people are scared of snakes, so he usually just plays at home or in the garden. He is nervous when Anna suggests a new adventure.

 

At first people are afraid, and Otis feels he isn’t welcome in the town. But Anna encourages Otis not to give up, and it soon turns out that maybe snakes aren’t as scary as people thought! The hairdresser enjoys shampooing a reptile for a change, and at the skate shop Sally has a lot of fun fitting Otis with his own set of awesome wheels.

 

Anna and Otis is full of endless rich details to spot and Maisie’s artwork is a real treat to pore over.

The almost true story of Steve, the very scary fish.
Steve is not very big. His teeth aren’t very sharp. And though he’s no angelfish, there are far scarier creatures in the sea. So why is everyone so frightened of Steve?
With a brilliant new voice and distinctive art style, Megan Brewis is definitely ‘one to watch’.

Robert Nobel, the school pariah, triumphs over his own fears and the school bully, in this extraordinary tale of self-empowerment, legend and death. Robert is a boy who can do anything – or so old Edith Sorrel at the nursing home tells him. Robert doesn’t think so, knowing as he does that he is the school geek. But something compels him to do what Edith asks – to visit old Chance House, where a boy once fell to his death from the top floor flat, to confront his fears and find some answers. Niker the bully thinks this is a great laugh. He challenges Robert to spend the night at Chance House with him – but there the balance of power changes, and it is Robert who proves to be the stronger. Niker feels threatened by the change – and when he finds out Robert’s secret obsession, to make the dying Edith Sorrel a coat of feathers like in the old legend of the Firebird, he knows just how to wrest his old power back. But just how important is the coat of feathers? Could it really save Edith’s life?

At the Old Inn, which clings unsteadily on a cliff top above a storm-lashed ocean, two sick children are left alone while their father fetches the doctor. Then a visitor comes begging for shelter, and so begins a long night of storytelling, in which young Ethan and Cathy, who have an unnatural appetite for stories of a spooky nature, sit out the last of the storm in the company of a sailor with more than enough grisly tales to satisfy them.

Ade lives on the seventeenth floor of an inner city tower block.
He’s just an ordinary boy.
Apart from the fact that his mother won’t leave her bedroom.
And he’s only got one true friend: the girl he’s known all his life, Gaia.

When the Bluchers, a type of mysterious plant-form, slowly take over the city, everyone is forced to evacuate and Ade is left alone to face them.

Trapped in his tower block, how can Ade ever survive as the Bluchers weave their deadly circle around his home?

Boy in the Tower is his story.

It’s about friendship.
It’s about courage.
It’s about finding a way back home.

 

 

Read an Extract HERE