For the very first time, young Moonshadow is flying south. Grandfather is leading the swans as they travel to a warm place for the winter. But when a terrible storm strikes, not all the swans make it through. Though his heart is heavy, Moonshadow finds the strength to continue the journey. Gillian Lobel’s beautifully written tale deals gently with loss and bereavement, while Karin Littlewood’s enchanting paintings create a memorable world for young readers.

A captivating picture book retelling by Shakespeare’s Globe for very young readers.

 

William Shakespeare’s dazzling play about magic, revenge and forgiveness is unforgettably re-imagined by Shakespeare’s Globe as a picture book for very young readers. The story is told from the perspective of Ariel in language that is true to the original play but accessible to all. With shimmering, exquisite illustrations by the acclaimed artist Jane Ray, this captivating retelling is a magical way to introduce children to the one of the best-loved works of the world’s greatest playwright.

This colorfully illustrated book tells the story of a baby Blue Whale, who longs to be included among the other creatures of the ocean, but is shunned because he is ‘different.’ The fish make fun of his size and won’t let him join in their games. However, when danger lurks in the form of a predatory shark, the fish learn an important lesson about accepting and embracing each other’s differences while Baby Blue realizes it’s okay not to be like everyone else.
Early readeraages 5-8.

Tally is eleven years old and she’s just like her friends. Well, sometimes she is. If she tries really hard to be. Because there’s something that makes Tally not the same as her friends. Something she can’t cover-up, no matter how hard she tries: Tally is autistic.

 

Tally’s autism means there are things that bother her even though she wishes they didn’t. It means that some people misunderstand, her and feel frustrated by her. People think that because Tally’s autistic, she doesn’t realise what they’re thinking, but Tally sees and hears – and notices – all of it. And, honestly? That’s not the easiest thing to live with.

A bold and colourful picture book with a heart-warming story about always being yourself.

 

Arnold blends right in with his bright pink flamingo family. Then a growling gang of lions stops by and demands that Arnold should be more lion-like, just like them. Poor Arnold tries but misses his old life. But then his flamingo family is threatened by the growling gang. Is this the moment when Arnold will find his roar?

London 1800. Jupiter is young, black, living at the African Academy in Clapham with other boys from wealthy Sierra Leonean families. His life is a mixture of privilege and dispossession as he copes with the cruelty of his teachers, the rivalries and tensions among his schoolmates, a sense of duty towards his younger brother Robert and guilt over the death of another brother in Africa. Throughout, Jupiter strives to maintain his dignity, his Christian faith and pride in his roots.

But beyond the relative ease of Clapham lies another London, where poor black communities struggle for survival along the squalid reaches of the Thames. A world where Jupiter’s education and background mean nothing and skin colour alone determines fate. Into this world his younger brother Robert vanishes, and Jupiter is obliged to follow …

When the scorching hot sun scares the rainclouds away, it leaves one lonely little cloud behind. The raincloud is sad as he has no friends. He joins dogs in the park, hovers over busy shoppers in the town and visits a wedding party, emerging from a church. Nobody wants to play with him. Then he spots a girl who looks miserable, like him – so he follows her.

The girl is grumpy in the market, grumpy on the metro, grumpy at home and still grumpy at her florist shop. The raincloud feels sorry for her, so he waters her plants – and the next morning, they all burst into bloom!

A thoroughly heartwarming book, with picture-perfect illustrations, about loneliness and finding friendship in the most unexpected places.

A Tale by Oscar Wilde. Illustrated and adapted by Maisie Paradise Shearring.

 

In a town where a lot of poor people suffer and where there are a lot of miseries, a swallow who was left behind after his flock flew off to Egypt for the winter, meets the statue of the late ‘Happy Prince’, who in reality has never experienced true sorrow, for he lived in a palace where sorrow isn’t allowed to enter. Viewing various scenes of people suffering in poverty from his tall monument, the Happy Prince asks the swallow to take the ruby from his hilt, the sapphires from his eyes, and the golden leaf covering his body to give to the poor. As the winter comes and the Happy Prince is stripped of all of his beauty, his lead heart breaks when the swallow dies as a result of his selfless deeds and severe cold. The statue is then brought down from the pillar and melted in a furnace leaving behind the broken heart and the dead swallow and they are thrown in a dust heap. These are taken up to heaven by an angel that has deemed them the two most precious things in the city. This is affirmed by God and they live forever in his city of gold and garden of paradise.