Stanley is a spider, a weaver and a collector. On his web he collects seeds, twigs, leaves and all kinds of precious things he cannot name. Stanley is very proud of his collection, but what can one tiny spider do when it is washed away? In this stunning, deceptively simple and thoughtful debut from animator, illustrator and writer Qian Shi we discover the difference between what you collect in the world and what you collect in your heart.

 

What to do when Grandpa and Grandma are too busy to play? Ask your imaginary elephant, of course! He’s tons of fun, even if he squashes the flower bed, breaks a few things around the house, and gets a little too splashy in the bathtub. But Grandpa and Grandma will understand — really. With his trademark vibrant, energetic illustrations, Petr Horácek introduces us to a delightfully enterprising child, some wisely laid-back grandparents, and the most endearing elephant you’ll ever want to meet.

Aubrey is a rambunctious boy who tries to run before he can walk and has crashed two cars before he is old enough to drive one. But when his father, Jim, falls under the horrendous spell of the Terrible Yoot, everything changes. With the help of the creatures of Rushing Wood Aubrey sets out to break the spell. Everyone says his task is impossible, but Aubrey will never give up, even if he must fight the unkillable spirit of despair – The Terrible Yoot – itself!

Funny and fearless, Aubrey and the Terrible Yoot is a modern-day fable that mixes real family life with fantastical woodland creatures and a more than a touch of myth and mystery, to tackle the theme of depression head on, complemented by powerful line drawings by illustrator Jane Matthews.

When Eddy Stone finds a pirate in his Gran's bath, his miserable summer holiday turns into a treasure hunt.

Setting sail in a ship-shaped shed, crewed by an old lady and a grumpy penguin, what could possibly stop them?

How big is the universe? Are there dogs in space? What if your friend – or your granddad – was an alien? Join the poets in wondering in Watcher of the Skies, a sparkling collection of poems about the outermost possibilities of space, life and our imaginations.

Fully illustrated by Emma Wright and accompanied with helpful facts from space scientist Rachel Cochrane (Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh) and ideas for writing poems from Rachel Piercey, this is the perfect companion for any budding stargazer or astronaut.

A lone bird sits in a big tree, merrily singing its tune to the world. But soon it will be joined by a friend, and then another, and another . . . As each colourful bird lands on the branch of the tree it joins the last in a cheerful song. But one flashy bird wants to rule the roost – until something small changes his tune!

Meet a troupe of circus performers who create sculptures from found objects and shapes. Using simple materials from around the home as well as their imaginations, this entertaining troupe reveal how much fun can be had bringing works of art to life.

Do you jump from one idea to the next?

Would you rather start tomorrow?

Join Sozi as she experiences the elation, struggle and triumph of making ideas happen.

Her idea is a story for all ages and a tale about getting to THE END.

Before long, people are calling for the current leader to resign and give someone else a go . . . and that’s how an ordinary boy like Joe ended up with the most extraordinary job. Now the fun can really start . . .
Hats for cats! Pet pigs for all! Banana shaped buses! Swimming pools on trains!
A hilarious story of one boy’s meteoric rise to power!

Perhaps a trip to the gallery to see five famous paintings by world-renowned British artists might give her some ideas? And can she help the shepherd boy from Constable’s ‘The Cornfield’ to round up all those pesky sheep?

For over two decades, the Katie series has been bringing art to life for young children. This adventure focuses on much-loved paintings from Turner, Gainsborough, Constable and Stubbs.