1919. Henry has moved to the countryside with her parents and her baby sister, Piglet – all still scarred by the death of her brother. Alone in her head, she begins to explore her surroundings, encouraged by her only friends – characters from her favourite books. Nobody much notices when she wanders into the woods at the bottom of the garden and meets Moth, a striking witch-like woman. Together they form a bond that could help Henry save her family.

In a bustling marketplace in Iran, a traditional storyteller regales her audience with the tale of Prince Zal and the Simorgh. High up on the Mountain of Gems lives the Simorgh, a wise phoenix whose flapping wings disperse the seeds of life across the world. When King Sam commands that his long-awaited newborn son Zal be abandoned because of his white hair, the Simorgh adopts the baby and raises him alongside her own chicks. She teaches him everything she knows. But when the king comes to regret his actions, Prince Zal will learn that the most important lesson of all is forgiveness.

A mythical tale of family, forgiveness and what it means to be truly wise, the book includes an original Iranian musical composition to stream online using the QR code in the book.

Tired of the same old princess-meets-her-prince stories? Bored of princesses in frilly pink dresses? Fed up with princes getting all the action? Yes? So is Princess Swashbuckle. She’s Swashbuckle by name, swashbuckling by nature and she’s about to show the world what a great pirate captain she can be. Charmingly breaking the mould, Princess Swashbuckle is a rollicking tale of adventure and finding your own happy

Join Katie as she steps into some of the most famous paintings in the world for an exciting art adventure!

When Katie visits an art gallery for the first time with Grandma, she discovers that art is wonderfully exciting, especially when five famous paintings come alive for her . . . Expect a little bit of mischief, a lot of cream cakes and even a friendly tiger!

George can’t roller-skate, George can’t paint, and George most certainly can’t dance!

But Bear is very wise. She thinks that, with a little help, George can do all these things – and more!

And, luckily for George, Bear has just a little magic to help . . .

 

Although the Secret Giant is rarely seen, grandad is convinced he exists. It was the Giant who stood watch when they were camping, fixed the town clock and protected their tiny boat in the storm. Billy isn’t so sure; how could someone so enormous never be seen?

But now Billy can’t reach the top of the town mural he’s painting: could the Giant help? As soon as Billy meets the Giant, Billy runs away: he’s HUMONGOUS! But then Billy wonders if the Giant is tired of scaring people because he’s different – maybe he’s lonely, and just wants a friend.

There’s a mysterious luminosity in this book’s delicately detailed illustrations (complete with hidden giant), alongside characters drawn with humour and compassion. It’s a magical story about accepting people who are different.

A charming picture book about a small child and her pet dog.

When the dog gets hiccups the child tries everything to cure them, but nothing works until she brings out her favorite cat costume. And that does the trick . . . Or does it? Turn the page and . . . HIC!

There are lots of fun noises to make and say in this perfect book to share with a toddler from a talented young artist.

The children of Mivtown have grown up hearing the legend of the monsters of the loch. But it’s only a story – a warning to stay away from the water.

Then strange things start happening in the village. Effie’s rabbit Buster escapes from a locked hutch, her mum disappears without trace and slugs start to infest her home.

Along with her best friend Finn, Effie begins to hunt for clues to solve the mysteries of Mivtown. Could this all be connected to the legend? Is it really just a story or is there something lurking in those deep, dark waters?

 

And did things that bears do . . . and do . . . and DO! One day the boy looked at the bear and realized he was just too big and bearish to be living in a house. “I think it’s time we found you a new place to live where you can be bearish and big,” said the boy. “But where, bear?”