Jay’s creative writing exercise is to write a fairy tale, to end with they lived happily ever after. But the way her life is panning out she s not sure it will ever reach that stage. She and her mother are moving in with distant relatives, and they have super strict rules for girls. Jay is expected to have only Indian friends if she has any at all. How can she see her school friends, Chloe and Matt? But this is only the beginning of a nightmare for Jay. When her life implodes, how can she hide the shame and how will she find a way to keep going?

Published in August 2019. It was Pick of the Week for Love Reading 4 Schools, and Book of the Week at Letterbox Library.

 

Jeevan’s an A star student in every subject apart from English. He suspects his English teacher, Mrs. Greaves, of marking him down on purpose. But no one believes him – even his best friends, Dread and Sandi, think he’s over-reacting. It seems that his teacher dislikes him intensely. He is sure that she is prejudiced against him because he is Asian.

Walking home from school through the woods, Jeevan catches Mrs. Greaves and another teacher, Mr. Green, up to something they shouldn’t be doing, and now he’s got this radioactive video that he could use against Mrs. Greaves.

But he’s caught in a moral dilemma – to do the right thing, or not?

That Asian Kid is a compelling story that explores the themes of racism, of identity, justice.

The poems have been carefully selected to chart the poet, Hulme’s journey from growing up in a working-class family in Leicestershire to his feelings and thoughts about school life and his experience as a transgender teenager. As Hulme says himself: “When it was decided that this collection would be for teenagers I was left with this determination, that this collection wouldn’t speak down to anyone, that the world I portrayed within it would be the world we live in, that there would be no attempt to make reality ‘appropriate for children’. People seem to forget that teenagers live in the same world as everyone else, and they face the same struggles adults face every day. Teenagers deal with racism and sexism and disability and poverty and so much more that we don’t even see. The things that are traditionally seen as inappropriate for young people to see, are so often the same things they experience day to day.”