The almost true story of Steve, the very scary fish.
Steve is not very big. His teeth aren’t very sharp. And though he’s no angelfish, there are far scarier creatures in the sea. So why is everyone so frightened of Steve?
With a brilliant new voice and distinctive art style, Megan Brewis is definitely ‘one to watch’.

Wilfred Walrus and Neville Narwhal are the only kids in Miss Blubber’s class who are not seals. Life is tough being the odd ones out – lunchtimes and football matches and school photos all present challenges to the two outliers. And they don’t even like each other very much!

When Betty Beluga joins the class, everything changes. Betty is smart and independent and amazing at football. As a friendship forms, Betty helps the two boys to recognise that being different isn’t always a bad thing!

A warm, funny tale about friendship and fitting in that school-aged children are sure to identify with. Isabella Bunnell’s joyous watercolour illustrations are complimented by luxuriant packaging.

An unlikely friendship between Miss Bandari and Mr Magarmach forms when the pair meet under the great plum tree, deep in the heart of India. Mr Magarmach is old and his hunting days are over but Miss Bandari loves hearing his stories as they munch plums together. One day their friendship is tested but with courage, trust and forgiveness they discover that living happily together tastes just as sweet as Miss Bandari’s golden plums.

The story of the monkey and the crocodile is a fable from the Panchatantra, an ancient Indian collection of animal fables dated to 300 BCE. But it’s a tale from around the world and versions can be found in Kenya, Tanzania, Ghana, China, Japan and the Caribbean.

Seth has a special ability: to see things from the past. He’s at a football match when flickering flames and a screaming, wild-haired man appear on the pitch. A storm hits from nowhere and the crowd panics. No-one’s hurt, but more odd things happen over the following days and Seth learns he’s seeing a 1000-year-old, brutal Viking massacre. Except the past is starting to affect the present. Seth must find a way to stop it – before the Vikings have his head too.

Defenders is a fast-paced story with a little something for everyone: football, history, friendship, mystery and danger, and even a hint of the supernatural. As a relatively short story in a dyslexia friendly font, it’s also ideal for reluctant or struggling readers. Seth and his best friend Nadiya are brilliantly engaging characters, drawing you straight into the story from page one.

Robert Nobel, the school pariah, triumphs over his own fears and the school bully, in this extraordinary tale of self-empowerment, legend and death. Robert is a boy who can do anything – or so old Edith Sorrel at the nursing home tells him. Robert doesn’t think so, knowing as he does that he is the school geek. But something compels him to do what Edith asks – to visit old Chance House, where a boy once fell to his death from the top floor flat, to confront his fears and find some answers. Niker the bully thinks this is a great laugh. He challenges Robert to spend the night at Chance House with him – but there the balance of power changes, and it is Robert who proves to be the stronger. Niker feels threatened by the change – and when he finds out Robert’s secret obsession, to make the dying Edith Sorrel a coat of feathers like in the old legend of the Firebird, he knows just how to wrest his old power back. But just how important is the coat of feathers? Could it really save Edith’s life?

Yazan no longer goes to the park to play, and he no longer sees his friend who lives next door. Everything around him is changing. His parents sit in front of the television with the news turned up LOUD and Yazan’s little red bike leans forgotten against the wall. Will he ever be able to go outside and play? An uplifting story about a courageous little boy growing up in a time of conflict, and the strength of family love.

The original three-volume anthology The Graphic Canon presented the world’s classic literature – from ancient times to the late 20th century – as eye-popping comics, illustrations and other visual forms. In this follow-up volume, young people’s literature through the ages is given new life by the best comics artists and illustrators. Fairy tales, fables, fantastical adventures, young adult novels, swashbuckling yarns, your favorite stories from childhood and your teenage years? they’re all here, in all their original complexity and strangeness, uncensored and unsanitised.

 

Rachael Ball and many more artists and illustrators reimagine great works of children’s literature, such as Ball, “THE WEARDALE FAIRIES.”

Jay’s creative writing exercise is to write a fairy tale, to end with they lived happily ever after. But the way her life is panning out she s not sure it will ever reach that stage. She and her mother are moving in with distant relatives, and they have super strict rules for girls. Jay is expected to have only Indian friends if she has any at all. How can she see her school friends, Chloe and Matt? But this is only the beginning of a nightmare for Jay. When her life implodes, how can she hide the shame and how will she find a way to keep going?

Published in August 2019. It was Pick of the Week for Love Reading 4 Schools, and Book of the Week at Letterbox Library.

 

Jeevan’s an A star student in every subject apart from English. He suspects his English teacher, Mrs. Greaves, of marking him down on purpose. But no one believes him – even his best friends, Dread and Sandi, think he’s over-reacting. It seems that his teacher dislikes him intensely. He is sure that she is prejudiced against him because he is Asian.

Walking home from school through the woods, Jeevan catches Mrs. Greaves and another teacher, Mr. Green, up to something they shouldn’t be doing, and now he’s got this radioactive video that he could use against Mrs. Greaves.

But he’s caught in a moral dilemma – to do the right thing, or not?

That Asian Kid is a compelling story that explores the themes of racism, of identity, justice.

It is late August 1939: Britain is on the brink of war, and preparations are under way to evacuate London’s children to the countryside. When twelve-year-old Tilly and her best friend Rosy find out that they will not be able to take their beloved dog and cat with them – and that, even worse, their pets will, along with countless other animals, be taken to the vet to be put down – they decide to take action. The two girls come up with the idea of hiding them in a derelict hut in the woods and, when other children find out and start bringing their rabbits, guinea pigs and hamsters, their secret den turns into an emergency zoo. Inspired by real events during the Second World War, Miriam Halahmy’s novel is a touching tale of courage, resourcefulness and camaraderie in desperate times, as well as a stirring defence of animal welfare.