Picture books are such good fun and so is making them but who knew there were so many things that could go wrong? This is the story of a picture book doomed from the very start. Allan has a good idea for book about a crocodile, but every time he sits down to write he is interrupted. The manuscript gets soaked in tea and nibbled by snails. And then when Bruce gets started on the pictures, he gets over-excited and draws a hippo not a crocodile. The publishers get over-excited too they want a dinosaur and experiment with all kinds of different fonts. Allan and Bruce think they’ve straightened things out, but then when the book goes off to the printer you guessed it there is MORE trouble. Pages in French and Chinese get muddled with the English, and somehow Bruce’s hippos and dinosaurs get mixed up with them too.

The Sea Tiger is Oscar’s best friend, Oscar’s only friend. They do everything together explore the ocean, visit the sea circus, even hitch a ride to the surface to look at the stars… But Oscar is not a Sea Tiger, and so it’s up to the Sea Tiger to help him find a new friend. A bittersweet tale from a stunning new talent in children’s illustration.

During the summer of her GCSEs Kite’s world falls apart. Her best friend, Dawn, commits suicide after a long struggle with feeling under pressure to achieve. Kite’s dad takes her to the Lake District, to give her time and space to grieve. In London Kite is a confident girl, at home in the noisy, bustling city, but in the countryside she feels vulnerable and disorientated. Kite senses Dawn’s spirit around her and is consumed by powerful, confusing emotions – anger, guilt, sadness and frustration, all of which are locked inside. It’s not until she meets local boy, Garth, that Kite begins to open up – talking to a stranger is easier somehow. Kite deeply misses her friend and would do anything to speak to Dawn just once more, to understand why . . . Otherwise how can she ever say goodbye?

A heartwarming tale of wit, warmth, friendship and self-confidence. Zeni’s week goes from bad to worse when she is fitted for braces and then sent to Magnolia Gardens Care Home for her Work Experience placement. But then Zeni meets Alice, an old lady with a story to tell and some lost false teeth to find. As Zeni takes on the challenge of finding the missing teeth, an unexpected friendship grows between the pair and as Zeni learns more about Alice’s life, she also comes to understand the power of stories.

 

Particularly suitable for struggling, reluctant and dyslexic readers aged 12+

Twelve-year-old Mira comes from a chaotic, artistic and outspoken family where it’s not always easy to be heard. As her beloved Nana Josie’s health declines, Mira begins to discover the secrets of those around her, and also starts to keep some of her own. She is drawn to mysterious Jide, a boy who is clearly hiding a troubled past and has grown hardened layers – like those of an artichoke – around his heart. As Mira is experiencing grief for the first time, she is also discovering the wondrous and often mystical world around her.

Aisha is a thirteen-year-old refugee living in London. Happy for the first time since leaving her war-torn home, she is devastated when her foster mother announces that a new family has been found for her and she will be moving on. Feeling rejected and abandoned, Aisha packs her bags and runs away, seeking shelter in the nearby woods.

Meanwhile, a few doors down, twelve-year-old Zak is trying to cope with his parents’ divorce. Living in a near-building site while the new house is being refurbished, he feels unsettled and alone. Discovering a piece of rubble with the original builder’s signature set into it, he starts researching the history behind his home – and in doing so finds a connection with a young soldier from the past, which leads him to an old air-raid shelter in the same woods.

Both children, previously unknown to each other, meet in the heart of the ancient city woodland as they come into the orbit of Elder, a strange homeless woman who lives amongst the trees – and, as helicopters hover overhead and newspapers fill with pictures of the two lost children, unexpected bonds are formed and lives changed forever . . .

It’s about the friendship between a kind monkey and an old crocodile…

Life as Zeba knows it could be over for good . . .

Zeba Khan is like any other sixteen-year-old girl: enjoying herself, waiting for exam results . . . and dreaming of the day she’ll meet her one true love.

Except her parents have other plans.

In Pakistan for the summer, Zeba’s world is shattered. Her future is threatened by an unthinkable – and forced – duty to protect her father’s honour.

But does she hold the secrets that will help her escape?

In the rise of Hitler and the Nazi party, a young man on the cusp of taking priestly vows, despite his interest in Ethel, Vango is suddenly made a fugitive. Fleeing the accusations of police who blame him for a murder, as well as more sinister forces with darker intentions, Vango attempts to trace the secrets of his shrouded past and prove his innocence before all is lost. Vango’s past is murky—he washed up on the shores of a remote Italian isle with his nurse, a woman desperate to hide his origins—yet Vango’s identity might hold the answer to why so many people want to find him. Centered on a mysterious, unforgettable, and romantic protagonist, Vango tells a thrilling story sure to captivate lovers of daring escapades and subversive heroes.

 

 

One winter morning, Barroux was walking down a street in Paris when he made an extraordinary find: the real diary of a soldier in World War I. Barroux rescued the diary from the trash and illustrated the soldier’s words. In this striking black and white graphic novel adaptation of a 100-year-old diary, the events of the first two months of World War I are given fresh meaning and relevance to modern audiences. This is living history that has the power to engage new generations through one man’s story that is silhouetted against the historical events that formed and transformed the world we live in today.